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On Strangers' Land

Posted by Bea Chang at Aug 27, 2015 05:05 PM |
Ashraf, a Youth Ambassador Program, takes us through his journey from Guyana to Vermont to Seattle - from the expected to unexpected!

For the past week and a half, students from various countries in the Caribbean were in Seattle for a program coordinated by FIUTS, in a contract with World Learning, called Youth Ambassador Program. We will be posting the students' reflection and experiences over the next week. Here's a post by Ashraf, an ambassador from Guyana:

Traveling to the glamorous United States of America has always been a dream. The long plane flights, chilly cold weather, delicious fast food and most of all the affordable technologies were all inspirations that grew my anticipation more and more as the days progressed subsequent to my selection as a participant in the Youth Ambassador Program Caribbean 2015. However, upon arrival to the U.S, it quickly dawned on me that the movies and advertisements may have exaggerated and my expectations of this ‘fairy tale land’ were clearly overrated. None the less, my exchange in America is thus far the best experience of my life and definitely increased my appreciation and love for my homeland: Guyana, Land of Many Waters.

The first leg of the program began in lush greeneries of Brattleboro, Vermont, where thirty-six students belonging to six various territories from across the Caribbean were huddled together on one campus and forced to forge relationships that quickly grew into close friendship ties. Focused on developing leadership and communication skills among the Caribbean Youth Ambassadors, the World Learning team facilitated positive growth among a batch of intelligent and passionate youths that are evidently destined to be leaders.  Personally, my most cherished moments in Vermont were bonding with young students like myself who embody and personify youth empowerment of which fortunately also included students from Iraq and Lebanon on similar exchanges. I also got a chance to fulfill my ambassadorial role in educating my Caribbean neighbors as well as international counterparts about my beautiful, resourceful and uniquely diverse country. Unfortunately though, just when we were enjoying every bit of the World Learning experience, the time came when we were required to part ways with members of our home teams and newly formed comrades by embarking on city departures for the second leg of this program aimed at developing an understanding of diversity and creating practical opportunities for civic engagement.

As though been assigned Seattle as my host city wasn’t already super exciting and auspicious,  my amazing city group and I stumbled upon the rare opportunity to spend a day touring Chicago due a malfunction in the radar system causing a delay in hundreds of flights around America (every gloomy South West cloud has its silver lining). Off to a late start however definitely took a toll in the continuation of our program. While many were already having difficulties adjusting in unfamiliar homes with a family of strangers, home sickness sneaked up on me like a thief in a dark, unacquainted alley. Unaware of the public transportation system in Seattle also has been my greatness challenge and still restricts me from exploring Washington as the fear of being lost is always on the winning end.  However, thanks to the hospitable Seattlites (especially my host family) and most importantly my supportive team of Caribbean students, mentors and World Learning facilitator, I am slowly embracing the awkward and unaccustomed and enjoying the experience. Though my highlights in Seattle thus far are defined mainly by my interactions with the homeless, the visit to the Space Needle, exploring the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation and touring China Town, the activity that was most outstanding to me was volunteering at North West Harvest. At North West Harvest, myself along with two of my Seattle teammates assisted in the organization’s daily distribution of food to the homeless and less fortunate. This experience definitely opened my mind to the struggles of the less privileged and direct contact with these anguish people allowed me to truly sympathize with them and also inspired me to consider the homeless in my country by sparking the initiation of a similar project in Guyana. That experience single handedly achieved FIUTS objectives to enhance my understanding of diversity and improve civic engagement. I must say, only few are afforded the opportunity to participate in such a generously sponsored and well implemented program and I am honored and grateful to be among such a minority.

The Youth Ambassador Program (YAP) Caribbean program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, promote a better understanding of the people, institutions, and culture of the United States among foreign students, teachers, and scholars. YAP is a program run by World Learning, a nonprofit organization empowering people and strengthening institutions through education, sustainable development, and exchange programs in more than 60 countries.

The program in Seattle is coordinated by the Foundation for International Understanding Through Students (FIUTS), a local non-profit organization affiliated with the University of Washington that promotes international friendship and cross-cultural understanding in the region.

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On the Move in Seattle

Posted by Bea Chang at Aug 27, 2015 03:45 PM |
Amani, a Youth Ambassador Program student from Suriname, writes about her experience in Seattle and getting people involved in her community back home.

For the past week and a half, students from various countries in the Caribbean were in Seattle for a program coordinated by FIUTS, in a contract with World Learning, called Youth Ambassador Program. We will be posting the students' reflection and experiences over the next week. Here's a post by Amani, an ambassador from Suriname:

Hi Guys,

My name is Amani Verwey,16 years old and the youngest Caribbean Youth Ambassador from Suriname, Paramaribo this year, which is an honor. Team Seattle is on the move and we are enjoying Seattle very much as we learn about the American culture in our host homes and  develop leadership skills. I miss the SIT University campus in Vermont, Brattleboro so much, where we actually spent our first week in the US learning about important aspects of the program such as how to be a great Youth Ambassador and how to encourage others to participate in their community.

We will be visiting a food bank and the most famous Space Needle tomorrow. I am super excited to spin around and not get dizzy, hopefully.Our team also learned a lot from Mr. Larry Gossett who we met yesterday at the King County Council.

I'm looking forward to getting back together with the whole Caribbean next week for our final part of the program in the beautiful Washington DC.

I'd love to tell this story to my peers and all youngsters back at home it will be a big encouragement to most of them!

The Youth Ambassador Program (YAP) Caribbean program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, promote a better understanding of the people, institutions, and culture of the United States among foreign students, teachers, and scholars. YAP is a program run by World Learning, a nonprofit organization empowering people and strengthening institutions through education, sustainable development, and exchange programs in more than 60 countries.

The program in Seattle is coordinated by the Foundation for International Understanding Through Students (FIUTS), a local non-profit organization affiliated with the University of Washington that promotes international friendship and cross-cultural understanding in the region.

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The Many Responsibilities of an Ambassador

Posted by Bea Chang at Aug 26, 2015 04:05 PM |
Latalia, a Youth Ambassador from the Bahamas, reflects on communication, teamwork, and leadership skills she learned as a part of her YAP program in Seattle!

For the past week and a half, students from various countries in the Caribbean were in Seattle for a program coordinated by FIUTS, in a contract with World Learning, called Youth Ambassador Program. We will be posting the students' reflection and experiences over the next week. Here's a post by Latalia, an ambassador from the Bahamas:

I was filled with excitement upon my arrival in Seattle. After being settled, THE JOURNEY HAD BEGUN !

When working with others in an organization, you would realize that , not everyone would agree with what you put forth. Voicing your opinion can sometimes be troublesome. Poor communication can also lead to a lack of interest, or participants not being able to understand the task that should be done. Sometimes it's  hard when dealing with "cultural exchange" because not everyone has the same qualities/background, and also a full schedule can affect ones ability to participate, because of not having much free time to "catch" themselves.

Other than the many challenges stated, I continuously improved on self development, team work, being a better leader and also creating new ideas. Those were areas where I gained more knowledge. The workshops, site visits and tours are awesome, and everyone can benefit from them. I've  learned that "with hard work comes success", and that a leader is also a follower. This program requires hard work, and I plan on doing my best to become a better leader. How? By respecting others and their opinions. Participation matters!

It was a pleasure being able to have such experience. I plan on using my skills to create a major project for my community , and also share the lessons learnt. I feel like I'm able , and with having ability , anything is possible. It wasn't a free ticket , but it was hard work  that got me here. I look forward to the following days here and to have respect for others in the organization. RESPECT is they key to SUCCESS.

The Youth Ambassador Program (YAP) Caribbean program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, promote a better understanding of the people, institutions, and culture of the United States among foreign students, teachers, and scholars. YAP is a program run by World Learning, a nonprofit organization empowering people and strengthening institutions through education, sustainable development, and exchange programs in more than 60 countries.

The program in Seattle is coordinated by the Foundation for International Understanding Through Students (FIUTS), a local non-profit organization affiliated with the University of Washington that promotes international friendship and cross-cultural understanding in the region.

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Giving Back in Seattle

Posted by Bea Chang at Aug 26, 2015 03:55 PM |
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Adrian, a Youth Ambassador from Trinidad, recounts one of his days in Seattle last week, as well as the lessons he gleaned from a food bank, Gates Foundation, and the Space Needle.

For the past week and a half, students from various countries in the Caribbean were in Seattle for a program coordinated by FIUTS, in a contract with World Learning, called Youth Ambassador Program. We will be posting the students' reflection and experiences over the next week. Here's a post by Adrian, an ambassador from Trinidad:

Wow what a day! Today was a nothing short of an amazing, unforgettable day that could never be fully expressed in mere 3 paragraphs, but I will try my best. The day began with a visit to the Northwest Food Bank in which my heart was truly moved. As I assisted in the distribution of potatoes, onions, fruits and vegetables to the persons, they gave me back something much more valuable in return -- a warm smile. I couldn't help but smile in elation as I felt the gratitude that was radiating from them. We also got the opportunity to meet so many people with so many different stories ranging from a Fijian to another person from the Caribbean and to hear their stories as we told ours. I was reminded how important it was to give back to a community and was in exchange rewarded with another life changing unforgettable memory.

Next we were to visit the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation where I learnt a great deal about the problems that are affecting people worldwide and their approach on the matter. It was very intriguing to see all the prototypes which tied back quite a bit with creativity workshops. I was truly in awe at the uniqueness of their exhibits, including and not limited to the rotating walls, the interactive and indulging activities which were fun, informative and was productive to both us and the foundation. In my opinion it was a very appropriate activity for this program and was a great opportunity to have since, in their words, we were on an interactive journey that brings to life the connections we share with others across the globe.

To close off the day we visited the wondrous Space Needle followed by a fun-filled dinner with fellow Ambassadors. The Space Needle simply gave us a full 360° perspective of Seattle mentally and physically. The range of persons present there was as large as the range of sceneries we could observe at 500 ft in the air. It was very relaxing and was a good tool to settle me down from the stupefying day we had. I was able to take away so much new knowledge and experiences especially when I was giving back.Today was, for me, the best day in Seattle thus far and one of the best days of my life.

The Youth Ambassador Program (YAP) Caribbean program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, promote a better understanding of the people, institutions, and culture of the United States among foreign students, teachers, and scholars. YAP is a program run by World Learning, a nonprofit organization empowering people and strengthening institutions through education, sustainable development, and exchange programs in more than 60 countries.

The program in Seattle is coordinated by the Foundation for International Understanding Through Students (FIUTS), a local non-profit organization affiliated with the University of Washington that promotes international friendship and cross-cultural understanding in the region.

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Beneath the Emerald City

Posted by Bea Chang at Aug 25, 2015 03:50 PM |
Sadieka, a Youth Ambassador Program student from Jamaica, reflects on the world beneath a beautiful city, and her experience and lessons she learned from a visit to Real Change.

For the past week and a half, students from various countries in the Caribbean were in Seattle for a program coordinated by FIUTS, in a contract with World Learning, called Youth Ambassador Program. We will be posting the students' reflection and experiences over the next week. Here's a post by Sadieka, an ambassador from Jamaica:

Seattle is known as the emerald city but have you ever considered what is beneath its beauty!!!!!

My name is from Sadieka Smith and I am the youngest youth ambassador for Jamaica. I am fifteen years of age and I am currently in Seattle.

A city known for its many natural beauty doesn't seem to have many flaws but a major part of Seattle problems reside with its homeless citizens. Meet Tracey Williams, also known as Cat Man. Dude called such name because anything you throw at him he always lands on his feet he is a vendor and was once homeless. A man known for his independence and his words of his past.



"Don't look down on me with pity"
"Walk a day in my shoes"

These are quotes used by Tracey. When people hear the word "homeless," they usually think of mentally ill people, drug addicts and alcoholics, but that is not the case with many. Being homeless means you don't have access to basic resources. Born in a family of twenty one siblings and a mother which was a lead cook, Tracey Williams began working at a young age and learnt to cook at the age of seven. Many could say he was a ladies man for he had six different women, two who bore his four children and the rest women on the side and after many life jobs and sleeping in his car he was homeless but I am not here to tell you his life story.

There is an organization by the name of Real Change located in Seattle put in place to help homeless persons but not only them anyone can be a vendor but unlike other businesses they do not ask for your back story.

"Start with something little and you don't know where it will take you"

That quote can be used to describe Real Change. They started out really small and now currently have eighteen staff members, four hundred vendors and two floors in a building with an aim to make the world whole once again and end classism. This small organization has won twenty six awards lat year for journalism and is know both locally and internationally. They assist homeless citizens along with trying to help any citizen in need of quick cash.

Tracey lost his job and turned to Real Change newspapers. It helps him to both socialize and earn a steady income. While selling real change news paper Tracey now lives in a tent with his dog currently lost his job as a cook but he still has real change. He said that if you walk up to him and talk to him then he would sell you a good day not just a newspaper but he will not walk up to you and offer to sell it for in his words he is a "newspaper stand".

On that note I would like you to pay attention to your homeless citizen and not judge them on there looks or stereotype the are place them in a class but I offer you sit down with some of them and hear their life stories.

The Youth Ambassador Program (YAP) Caribbean program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, promote a better understanding of the people, institutions, and culture of the United States among foreign students, teachers, and scholars. YAP is a program run by World Learning, a nonprofit organization empowering people and strengthening institutions through education, sustainable development, and exchange programs in more than 60 countries.

The program in Seattle is coordinated by the Foundation for International Understanding Through Students (FIUTS), a local non-profit organization affiliated with the University of Washington that promotes international friendship and cross-cultural understanding in the region.

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Embrace the Awkward

Posted by Bea Chang at Aug 25, 2015 03:20 PM |
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Sefanja, a YAP student from Suriname, reflects on her first two day in Seattle, how to step out of her comfort zone, and lessons she will take back to her country.

For the past week and a half, students from various countries in the Caribbean were in Seattle for a program coordinated by FIUTS, in a contract with World Learning, called Youth Ambassador Program. We will be posting the students' reflection and experiences over the next week. Here's a post by Sefanja, a student from Suriname:

Hi,my name is Sefanja Warner Youth Ambassador of my lovely country Suriname.

I'm 18 years old and this year I'm finishing my high school. I love to design things, make cupcakes and birthday cakes, I also love to travel, shopping and singing. During this Youth Ambassador exchange program I've learned a lot. Although I'm just 2 days in Seattle I have learned a lot of things that I will definitely bring home to my country.

At first I want to implement a P-patch on a bigger scale in Suriname where all the food will be given to poor people who can't afford a daily meal everyday. The second thing I've learned is that if you want to be a good ambassador you have to be open minded, give respect to get respect, say things in a diplomatic way, this can help you to not hurt people feelings. This is a good way to represent your country.

A lesson I surely will take home is embrace the awkwardness. Get COMFORTABLE with the UNCOMFORTABLE. As an individual I want to develop my leadership skills more and I also want to figure out which way would be better to do a community service/project.

The Youth Ambassador Program (YAP) Caribbean program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, promote a better understanding of the people, institutions, and culture of the United States among foreign students, teachers, and scholars. YAP is a program run by World Learning, a nonprofit organization empowering people and strengthening institutions through education, sustainable development, and exchange programs in more than 60 countries.

The program in Seattle is coordinated by the Foundation for International Understanding Through Students (FIUTS), a local non-profit organization affiliated with the University of Washington that promotes international friendship and cross-cultural understanding in the region.

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Facilitator Corner: Hassan Almuzaini

Posted by Bea Chang at Aug 20, 2015 11:05 AM |
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FIUTS Facilitator, Hassan Almuzaini, shares his experiences of overcoming obstacles as an international student, how his involvement in FIUTS events eased the transition, and why he continues to stay involved as a facilitator.

FIUTS Facilitators are student leaders from all over the world who welcome new international visitors, help organize events, and lead activities for hundreds of students each quarter. Read on to find out more about the FIUTS facilitator experience from Hassan and join us today!

Name: Hassan Almuzaini
Country: Saudi Arabia
Major: Electrical Engineering
Class: IELP (Intensive English Language Program)
FIUTS Facilitator Since: June 2015

"In the 10 months being with FIUTS and meeting people from all walks of life, I have learned about many cultures, encouraged and challenged myself, inspired others, and forged many friendships along the way." - Hassan Almuzaini


Brief Introduction

I came to the US in September 2014 with the intention of pursuing a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering after finishing IELP. It was a big challenge to come to a new country with different people, cultures, background and weather. It was hard for me in the beginning to adjust to my new life and deal with the many obstacles I had to face. I heard about FUITS from an IELP advisor within the first month of the program. Since, I’m an active person who likes to keep himself busy, I started attending any and all events that I could go to. This gave me the opportunity to meet people of different ethnicities, learn their cultures and forge many new friendships. FUITS has changed my life in the US for the better.

What does it mean to be a FIUTS facilitator?

Being a FIUTS facilitator is all about helping people, most of whom are international students, and making them feel comfortable and happy in their second home. During my involvement in FIUTS, I came across an amazing opportunity to participate in a program called SUSI (Study of the U.S. Institutes) that was held for one month. During that month, I met many people from different South Asian countries. In the 10 months being with FIUTS and meeting people from all walks of life, I have learned about many cultures, encouraged and challenged myself, inspired others, and forged many friendships along the way. Overall, FIUTS has changed the way I see the world.

Favorite FIUTS anecdote as a facilitator

In only one month, I have facilitated only one FIUTS event. However, I was involving in other many events through the SUSI program. Most of the events that I was involved with were really amazing, valuable, and made great memories, such as Golden Garden Beach, Mt Rainer Hike, camping at Pack Forest, and 4th of July Festival and Fireworks at Gasworks Park. All of these events were so much fun and new experiences for me.

Tips/comments for peer facilitators

Volunteering at FIUTS events gives you a chance to make lifelong friendships. Most of the students who participate are from different cultures, which give us a chance to share our cultures among one another and understand each other. Also, try to interact with everyone by listening and talking with them. Feel free to share your experiences and stories. Finally, of course, don’t forget to have fun and don’t miss this amazing opportunity.

Become a FIUTS Facilitator today! Click here for more information.

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A Letter From Bosnia: David Jeremic

Posted by Bea Chang at Aug 18, 2015 02:40 PM |
The alumni of the Youth Leadership Program with Bosnia and Herzegovina are hard at work using what they learned in the U.S. to do great projects back in their home communities. Here's a blog post about an initiative from our participant in last Fall's program!

The alumni of the Youth Leadership Program with Bosnia and Herzegovina are hard at work using what they learned in the U.S. to do great projects back in their home communities. Here's a blog post about an initiative from our participant in Fall 2014's program about how the program influenced him and a whole music community in Sarajevo!

Hello, my name is David Jeremic, and this is the story of how my life changed. One day I was sitting in my English class, when our professor told us about this great project that she had been a participant of, called the Youth Leadership Program (YLP). The goal of the program is to take 18 young activists from Bosnia and Herzegovina to the US for a month, placing them in authentic American families, and educating them in youth activism and civic engagement. I applied, and I was shocked when I got the call and that I'd been chosen as a participant.

The experience was amazing, and we learned so much. There were a lot of ups and downs that made my experience even more beautiful and unique. I really have a need to thank the US government for funding this program, and making so many young people’s dreams come true. I want to thank Lejla Pasovic, our project coordinator, for being an example for us, and always helping us every step of the way. I also want to thank our friends over at FIUTS, who made our journey a memorable one, and who have since helped us in our follow-up endeavors. I can't forget my amazing wonderful hosts Steve and Charlene, who took us in as family, and who I hope to see again and have family reunion.

After I got back to Bosnia, I started making some serious changes in my life. I started to volunteer on a weekly basis, and became a member of many youth activist groups in Bosnia and Herzegovina, including the association for high schoolers in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where I have met many wonderful people, and Narko Ne which I can’t wait to work with in future projects.

My goal for my follow up project was to raise awareness for young musicians in Sarajevo, which I achieved in the form of a musical march and concert. The project's name was Echo 2015, which was a fitting name, implying that our goal is a noble one, and that it should echo around and reach more people. Coordinating a project is really hard! Tom, Ellen and everyone from FIUTS deserve a medal for this stuff. From the beginning I was met with so many difficulties that I was simply overwhelmed. So many problems with so many people. So many things to consider, and so many things to worry about. But if I focused on the negative, I would’ve quit many times. Instead, I chose to focus on the positive. I established many connections that will be useful in the future, and I met twenty great people who I enjoyed working with, and all of whom I consider personal friends. I had not one, but three separate TV appearances, which was awesome. And to top it all off, I conquered my stage fright, which was a problem that had been haunting me for several years.

But most importantly, I did something. I saw a problem that needed to be addressed, and I did so through the power of music. Echo was a success, and if one of my participants becomes a part of the next YLP program, they will make an ECHO 2016, establishing a tradition and truly carrying the spirit of the YLP. This has truly been the most eventful year of my life, and I am so glad to have met all of these people, and to have done all these great things. I guess this blog post brings me closure, and I am at the same time sad and incredibly happy looking forward to the future, while remembering the past. Again, this is David Jeremic, and thank you for changing my life.

The Youth Leadership Program with Bosnia and Herzegovina is sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, U.S. Department of State. Learn more about the program here.

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Welcome, Fatih and Sara!

Posted by Bea Chang at Aug 14, 2015 02:45 PM |
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FIUTS is very excited to have two new friendly faces, Fatih and Sara, at the front desk. Find out more about them and come by to say hi!

FIUTS is very excited to have two new friendly faces at the front desk, returning mails, answering phone calls, researching, working on events and activities, and greeting walk-ins. Fatih and Sara are our work-studies for the summer and you will see them around! Here they are, introducing themselves to our community:

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Name: Fatih Thompson

Hometown: Everett, WA

Year: Graduate Student

School/Major: English - TESOL

About me: I’m a grad student in the MA in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) program.  I was born in Istanbul, Turkey and have lived there off and on, although I grew up in nearby Everett.  After graduating from UW in 2008 I spent about six years teaching English in Turkey, during which I got the chance to do a lot of travelling, especially in Europe.  I love travelling and plan to go abroad again for a few months to a year after I graduate next year.

In my free time I enjoy movies, concerts, going out for coffee, food and/or drinks, or just exploring the city.  Studying Russian has been a long-term hobby for me and I’m always looking for people to practice with.  I love meeting people from different cultures, which is why I’m excited to be spending the summer with FIUTS.

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Name: Sara Molaie

Hometown: Sary, Iran

Year: Graduate Student

School/Major: Comparative Religion

About me:

Hi, my name is Sara and I am a new graduate student at the Jackson School of International Studies majoring in Comparative Religion. I am an Iranian-American and have extensive international experience. To extend my experience, I joined FIUTS to have more opportunities to interact with more diverse education seekers and learn about their distinctive cultures. Disregarding the cross-cultural aspect of it, I like FIUTS because of its live and vibrant nature while supporting the international students through their transitions. As an event and marketing assistant at FIUTS, I enjoy working on the Students plans and programs.

I love and live with music. I am also a Persian musician and have performed in numerous occasions.  Language is my other passion and I am always ready to learn a new one.

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Homestay Interview: Guangzhou, China

Posted by Bea Chang at Aug 12, 2015 10:35 AM |
Because our high school students from China could not stop chatting about their weekend homestay with our hosts, FIUTS decided to stop by their classes and interview them about their cultural exchange experiences. Read what they had to say about living in an American home for two days!

In addition to English classes in the morning and activities around Seattle in the afternoon, our two-week Seattle Summer English Program also placed 22 high school students from Guangzhou, China in host families in and around Seattle for a weekend of cultural exchange. For many of our students, the homestay was a highlight of the program. Bear, a student, wrote, “The whole weekend is unforgettable and every events moved me deeply.”

Before the students left us to tour San Francisco and Los Angeles on their way back to China, we stopped by their class and asked them a few questions about their two days with their host families! Here is what they had to say:

(With this post, we would like to thank our hosts immensely for their hospitality and generosity, and we wish the Chinese students a safe trip back to China!)

Question 1: What was your favorite activity that you did this weekend with your hosts?

  • “We went to see the Sea Fair called ‘Blue Angel’ while we were having a really American party. I love the hot dogs!” – January
  • “We went fishing by the Greenlake and went to a real forest. We found some bananas slugs and caught frogs with Aurelia and Dinko.” – Hingis
  • “Going to the cinema, go to eat American food, go swimming.” – Ezio
  • “My favorite activity with my hosts was visiting History Museum.” – Joe
  • “My favorite activity that I did this weekend with my hosts was watching a musical play.” - Zion
  • “My favorite activity were swam in the swimming pool and visited in the zoo and made dinner.” – Kiwi
  • “My favorite activity was that we went to beach to find the starfish” – David X
  • “My favourite activity with my host is helping them to sell some second-hand things in order to help many cats.” – Crystal

Question 2: What did you learn or find funny about an American family?

  • “I learn a lot about the foods culture in America. I also played baseball for the first time in my life with them, it’s really interesting” – January
  • “I think the dominoes game we played was really amusing.” – Tina
  • “I learn how to play golf and know more about sea creatures and flowers. And I’m amusing to see many birds fly through in front of their house.” – Joy
  • “In my host family I learn about that Seattle is a good city, it’s very quiet and in Seattle people are very friendly.” – Jay
  • “My host said there are more dogs than kids in Seattle.” – Alien
  • “I was sitting between a dog and two cats when I was having lunch.” – Tiffany
  • “I learn that we should pick up the rubbishes on the ground and throw it in the bin.” – Joe
  • “They usually take the shower in the morning.” – Zion
  • “They get water from fridge, it’s cool! And their bed are very soft and comfortable.” – Henry
  • “I found that playing with the cats was funny.” - Jimmy

Question 3: What did you like the most about your host family?

  • “Diana is a great painter and Carmaig’s music makes me relax. They are really patient. Their kids are so cute! I love them all!” – Hingis
  • “The freedom and democracy.” – Curtis
  • “I like the black cats most…The black cats always give me surprise. She is cute and beautiful.” – Grace

Question 4: What was the most memorable moment from your weekend?

  • “I will never forget playing card games with two little boys, they were so cute.” – January
  • “Our shoes were wet on the beach. They were really friendly and came back home to help us dry the shoes and socks. Wow – I was greatly touched by what they did.” – Tina
  • “When we were standing at the bottom of the waterfall, looking up at the top of it.” – Alien
  • “We went to the beach and saw the beautiful sunset.” – Chris
  • “After dinner we went for a walk and saw a snake lying on the grasses but it doesn’t move.” – Tiffany
  • “Climbing mountain was the most memorably thing because we saw a deer.” – Joe
  • “James was a very tall and big man.” - Danny
  • “I can’t forget the burgers and French chips and the onion in the Red Robin. It’s cool!” – David L.
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